Friday, January 31, 2014

: How Would the U.S. Media Cover the Super Bowl if It Were in Another Country?


The two finest teams from the nation's 32 premier league squads meet each year in an event known as the Super Bowl. (There is in fact no bowl.) This year, the game pits a young upstart team from the Northwest Frontier Provinces against another from the mountainous interior region led by the aging scion of one of the sport's most legendary families. The winner of the contest will claim the title of "world champion," although very few people play the sport beyond the country's national borders.

While the competition can last for more than three hours, actual playing time is no more than about 11 minutes. The rest of the time is taken up by military-level strategizing, replays of the action, and providing medical attention to injured players. The game's rules are so intricate that television networks employ teams of well-paid "analysts" to explain to viewers what happened in the play they just watched.

But the spectacle of the Super Bowl—which can consume more electricity on its own than some small countries—involves more than just football. The nation's largest corporations use the event to showcase their latest products in elaborately produced advertisements that some fans find as entertaining as the game itself. (American businesses, in defiance of normal economic logic, consider it worthwhile to spend $4 million on just 30 seconds of airtime during the event.) America's premier recording artists are brought out to perform at the game's midpoint. Millions of chickens are slaughtered to obtain only their wings—the traditional American delicacy consumed by fans at home.

full @ http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2014/01/30/if_it_happened_there_how_would_we_cover_the_super_bowl_if_it_were_in_another.html





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