Friday, November 21, 2014

What British people say vs. what they really mean

 
What the British Say:
"With all due respect..."

What Americans hear:
"He is listening to me."

What they really mean:
"I think you are an idiot."



Thursday, November 20, 2014

Just fun: Your Silicon Valley job title is...

 

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Grand mountain ranges stretched across the printed page


German's reputation for long words is well-deserved (average word length in English: 8.2 characters, in German: 11.7 characters

English doesn't hesitate to borrow words from another language even if it makes it look fat. From German we have borrowed one-syllable putsch and kitsch, as well as Scrabble-defying gotterdammerung and sprachgefuhl.



 "I would do away with those great long compounded words; or require the speaker to deliver them in sections, with intermissions for refreshments." 
~ Mark Twain 


"... these long things are hardly legitimate words, but are rather combinations of words, and the inventor of them ought to have been killed."
~ Mark Twain
 

RE: Geography gaffe

A friend commented:

There's a trick.  The temperature reading below 32 degrees F in Hawaii was at the peak of Mauna Kea, 13,800 feet above sea level.


OK, so technically they're correct.


But I refute it using a technique employed by Al Sleet, the Hippy-Dippy Weatherman:
"The temperature at the peak of Mauna Kea is below 32 degrees... which is stupid, man, cause I don't know anyone who lives on a mountain peak."

=====


At least five people have died in New York after a huge storm dumped 5ft (1.5m) of snow in parts of the state.
Temperatures across all 50 US states plummeted to freezing, and there were several snow-related deaths elsewhere.



All 50 states?
Ummm, I don't think it's freezing in Hawaii.



Geography gaffe

 
 From the BBC website:

At least five people have died in New York after a huge storm dumped 5ft (1.5m) of snow in parts of the state.
Temperatures across all 50 US states plummeted to freezing, and there were several snow-related deaths elsewhere.


=====

All 50 states?
Ummm, I don't think it's freezing in Hawaii.



Friday, November 14, 2014

scientific exchange from the movie "Awakenings"


Dr. Sayer (Robin Williams): "Earthworms!"

Dr. #1: "I'm sorry?"

Dr. Sayer: "It was an immense project. I was to extract 1 decigram of myelin from 4 tons of earthworms."

Dr. #1: "Really?"

Dr. Sayer: "Yes! I was on that project for 5 years. I was the only one who believed in it. Everyone else said it couldn't be done."

Dr. #2: "It can't."

Dr. Sayer: "I know that now.  I *proved* it."



 

 
Dr. Evil: Very well, where should I begin? My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low-grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen-year-old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet. My father would womanize, he would drink, he would make outrageous claims, like he invented the question mark. Sometimes he would accuse chestnuts of being lazy. A sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament. My childhood was typical. Summers in Rangoon, luge lessons. In the spring we'd make meat helmets. If I was insolent, I was placed in a burlap bag and beaten with reeds. Pretty standard, really. At the age of twelve I received my first scribe. At the age of fifteen, a Zoroastrian named Vilma ritualistically shaved my testicles. There really is nothing like a shaven scrotum. At the age of eighteen, I went off to evil medical school. From there...



 

Thursday, November 13, 2014

C'est WHAT ?

 
 
When we don't understand something, we say, "It's Greek to me."

What do they say in Greece?
What do they say in other countries?
 
answer:  http://www.omniglot.com/language/idioms/incomprehensible.php



Tuesday, November 11, 2014

The story of the 'most complicated' watch in the world


A "complication" is a technical term referring to any feature on a watch which is in addition to simply telling the time - and Henry Graves Jr wanted more than anyone else. 


The Supercomplication, made by Patek Philippe in 1932, has 24 of them including Westminster chimes, a perpetual calendar, sunrise and sunset times, and a celestial map of New York as seen from Graves's apartment on Fifth Avenue.


It was commissioned in 1925 but was not delivered to [Graves] until 1933. It has 900 parts and remains the most complicated watch built without the assistance of computers, according to Sotheby's. One of its functions shows sidereal time, which is based on the amount of time it takes the Earth to make two consecutive transitions of a meridian by a fixed start. A sidereal day is approximately 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.1 seconds.


It was last wound in 1969. And it's still working.


full @

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-30002096


John Stewart on Clickbait

 
Jon Stewart, in the current New York magazine cover story ... was asked about his Internet-media diet: "Do you look at BuzzFeed; do you look at Vice news?"

Stewart, relatably, confessed to haphazardly wading through the deluge of content: "I scroll around, but when I look at the Internet, [and] I feel the same as when I'm walking through Coney Island. It's like carnival barkers, and they all sit out there and go, 'Come on in here and see a three-legged man!' So you walk in and it's a guy with a crutch."

It's Everywhere, the Clickbait


Monday, November 10, 2014

MIT’s Crazy Materials Could Make for Self-Assembling Ikea Furniture

 
the Self-Assembly Lab focuses on making things that can, well, self-assemble. It has created a series of small wood planks, for instance, that fold into a toy elephants when exposed to moisture. Tibbets and collaborators Christophe Guberan and Erik Demaine are working on clothing that could morph in response to the weather. In the future, the Lab's research could make way for Ikea furniture that assembles itself with a splash of water—no Allen wrench required.



Friday, November 07, 2014

Don't Eat That !!!

 

  • Potted Meat Food Product
  • Natto
  • Cuitlacoche
  • Silkworm Snacks

and more!

(the comments he makes about each of the foods are interesting)



San Diego Hosts Convention of People Who Shot Bin Laden

 

The New Yorker
The Borowitz Report

SAN DIEGO (The Borowitz Report)—The San Diego Convention Center is hosting the first-ever convention of people who shot Osama bin Laden, with organizers expecting a turnout of between three thousand and four thousand.
Read more at newyorker.com
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Alarming actions

 

I've torn out my alarm system & resigned from Neighborhood Watch.

I've got two Pakistani flags flying in my front garden and the black flag of ISIS on the front lawn.

The local police and other intelligence services are all watching my house 24/7. 

I've never felt safer.

 


 

Tuesday, November 04, 2014

Hand Position. That's the key.

 

Extra Credit SMACK-Down!

 

A friend of mine, Brian Robison, is a Lecturer in the Department of Music at Northeastern University. 

One of the classes he teaches is the History of Rock Music.


Attached is the extra credit question he included in on of his exams.



Monday, November 03, 2014

Alphanumerics

 
I eat breakfast on Saturdays at a local deli. The Weekend Specials are designated with number-letter combinations. Last week I ordered my usual, a B9.

The waitress was new, and asked, "What's a B9?"

I replied, "The opposite of malignant."




Friday, October 31, 2014

What not to name your WiFi Network

 

 WiFi Network Named 'Al Quida' Singlehandedly Delays Flight 17 Hours

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Not Dead Yet!

 

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

FW: IRS Phone Scam Alert

\
 




Don't fall victim to a widely used phone scam.

The scam starts with a phone call from a so called "IRS agent" demanding payment for back taxes. They will say that if not paid you will be arrested, your home will be taken away, or the FBI is waiting outside your house and many other ways to try to scare and intimidate you. If you also try to say you want to get your son/daughter, accountant, financial advisor, attorney on the phone they will say that you will be arrested because the phone call is private.

 PLEASE UNDERSTAND THIS IS A SCAM AND THIS IS NOT HOW THE IRS WORKS!

The IRS does not initiate with a phone call to try to collect taxes from an individual. It always starts with a letter. Please do not fall for these con artists who are preying on the elderly, widowed or anyone they can get on the phone. If you receive any call of this nature we suggest you hang up immediately and either contact the IRS directly through the number listed on their website, www.irs.gov, and/or contact your accountant. You can also contact your local police department to notify them about the call.

Please pass this along to all friends and family as it is something that is now running rampant across the country. We have attached a link to the IRS website that discusses how this scam works:

http://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/IRS-Warns-of-Pervasive-Telephone-Scam



 

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

David Sedaris - "The Santaland Diaries"


You might not expect "Santa's Helper" to be a career-altering gig, but for David Sedaris, it changed everything.


The writer and humorist spent a season working at Macy's as a department store elf. He described his short tenure as Crumpet the Elf in "The Santaland Diaries," an essay that he read on Morning Edition in 1992.


Instantly, a classic was born. Sedaris' reading has become an NPR holiday tradition. 
Click the link to hear Sedaris read his tale:



And here's a link to David reading the entire story as published: 4 audio segments: