Friday, August 21, 2015

New app available for shits and giggles...



Pooductive
poo.duc.tive
adj./n.

A place of magic and wonder where people from all 7 kingdoms can meet to seek refuge and enjoy their time of zen, peace and quite together, by conversing, philosophizing and sharing ideas with each other... whilst sitting on their iron thrones

http://www.pooductive.com



Thursday, August 20, 2015

RIP Yvonne Craig

 
Best known for playing "Batgirl" she also appeared as an Orion Slave Girl

"In one of her more memorable roles, Ms. Craig played Marta, a green-skinned slave girl, in the "Star Trek" episode "Whom Gods Destroy." She performed a seductive, loose-limbed dance that seemed to nearly overwhelm William Shatner's red-blooded Captain Kirk, while Leonard Nimoy's Mr. Spock pronounced it "mildly interesting."

Monday, August 17, 2015

it’s a fork, a spoon ... and a knife




THE SPORF IS an unsolvable design problem. Think about it: It's a tool with three jobs—it's a fork, a spoon  and a knife—but isn't equipped to do any of them well. The utensil was pretty much born to fail. As if that isn't enough, it's also got a horrible name, so we will refer to it as a spork, which is a great name.

You can't design a perfect sporf, er, spork, because there will always be compromises. But it is possible to design a better spork. A more usable spork. A less ugly spork. 

Map Project has done exactly that. The London studio recently unveiled the Tritensil, which is a fancy name for a spork with a knife on it. But it's the prettiest damn spork in existence, and a testament to what creative design thinking can do.


full @ http://www.wired.com/2015/08/tritensil-spork/



Saturday, August 15, 2015

It's fun to watch people feed the trolls...

 

After Target announced that they would be making their toy section "gender neutral," there was quite an angry response from shoppers, who took to the retail giant's Facebook page to voice their displeasure.

That's where an opportunistic Mike Melgaard came in. Posing as an official Target customer service account, Melgaard pulled off one of the greatest troll jobs ever, fielding complaints from customers railing against the "progressive liberals" at Target for their "political correctness."


From Gizmodo:

All Melgaard needed to fuel outrage and confusion was a Facebook account he created called Ask ForHelp that sported Target's bullseye logo. Ask ForHelp was obviously not verified, but most people didn't care, interacting with Melgaard and growing increasingly irate as he trolled their gender neutral hatin' ways. Ars Technica points out that "rather than checking for a verified blue checkmark," they believed that Ask ForHelp was legit at first glance and sought repeatedly to report him to Target overlords. When Melgaard screencapped his shenanigans and posted them to Facebook, the prank went viral.


attached are several of his screen captures

enjoy



Friday, August 14, 2015

What people in the 24th century do for fun


I'm reading Kage Baker's latest book, a science-fiction novel with social
satire. In this book, the 24th century's very safe, but very boring.

The governments are moral (too moral) and have banned everything that's 
"wrong" or "unhealthy." There's no meat to eat. No dairy products,
either, because that's considered animal cruelty, too.

There's no tobacco, no alcohol, no coffee, no tea, no chocolate (they're 
stimulants or depressants, and drugs are bad). Being overweight will get you
a hefty fine. If you don't lose weight, you're "hospitalized."

However, since it's the 24th century, they do have time travel, but only 
the super-rich can afford it. So they take vacations back in time.

Do they visit prehistoric times to see dinosaurs?  No.

Do they journey to see the splendor that was Greece, and the grandeur that
was Rome?  No.

They travel back to the 20th century to drink wine, eat cheese and smoke 
cigars.

.


Thursday, August 13, 2015

Ah, the Good Old Days before the TSA ...


 
 ... when you could bring a Katana onto an airplane.

.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Set phasers on "kill."

 

Wednesday, August 05, 2015

Star Wars cards signed by Mark Hamill


If Great Scientists had Logos


 

Updated Laws

 

Friday, July 31, 2015

Too soon?

 

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker visits Pat’s and Geno’s amid protests, bad cheesesteak orders

 
 
Scott Walker cut in line at Geno's... and ordered a cheesesteak with American cheese and no onions.


 

ranking religions

 

I'm not surprised. 
Adobe knocks on my computer update door more often than Jehovah Witnesses.
.

Friday, July 17, 2015

Sleep Working

 .

I had a strange dream last night. I was hired by a Deli, and my job was to taste test the Pastrami they made.

I do think that when you get a sudden food craving it's because it's been absent in your diet for a while. 

However, I was unaware that I was not eating enough Pastrami in my sleep.


.

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

What Songs Look Like as 3-D Printed Sculptures

 

Lead by Allison Wood and Kei Gowda, Reify turns sound waves into 3-D printed sculptures that play the sound back with an augmented reality app. 

Music was a natural place to start. Wood began thinking about how she might translate music's ephemeral nature into something tangible and permanent. She came up with the totem, an object 3-D printed in plastic or plated in bronze as a visual, physical representation of a song.
The totems are in some ways a sophisticated music player. The app reads its form much like a stylus on a record or a laser on a CD and plays it through your phone. When the totem enters your phone's camera frame, it begins to animate on your screen, creating a customized augmented reality experience. "It's using your phone like a looking glass into the digital world," says Wood.

http://www.wired.com/2015/07/reify-3-d-printed-song-sculptures/


.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Trump campaign poster?

 

Friday, July 10, 2015

Welsh assembly UFO question prompts dip into trilingualism with Klingon

 
  http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jul/10/star-trek-welsh-assembly-ufo-question-prompts-dip-into-trilingualism-with-klingon

I don't know which language is more unintelligible; Klingon or Welsh.


 

Wednesday, July 01, 2015

Work / Life balance

 

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Visit Revolutionary War soldiers at the National Constitution Center July 2-4th


Thursday, June 25, 2015

Mrs Peel, he's still needed.


Avengers star Patrick Macnee dies

 "Extraordinary crimes against the people, and the state, have to be avenged by agents extraordinary. Two such people are John Steed, top professional, and his partner Emma Peel, talented amateur. Otherwise known as The Avengers."


.


Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Strawberry curry anyone?


Watson's AI-created recipe app goes live

An app which allows users to download recipes suggested by IBM's supercomputer Watson is going live for the public to test.

The Chef Watson app offers unique recipes by combining ingredients with data about the way humans perceive food.

The app is being launched with food magazine Bon Appetit.

The food served up by the cognitive computing platform has had mixed reviews.


http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-33237527

.


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

‘Jaws is no horror movie – it’s actually a comedy’

 
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20150615-jaws-is-actually-a-comedy

=====

"I've seen The Exorcist about a hundred and sixty-seven times... and it keeps getting funnier... EVERY SINGLE TIME I SEE IT!"
 - Michael Keaton in Beetlejuice

.

Monday, June 22, 2015

RIP Vincent Musetto

 

Vincent Musetto, a retired editor at The New York Post who wrote the most anatomically evocative headline in the history of American journalism — HEADLESS BODY IN TOPLESS BAR — died on Tuesday in the Bronx. He was 74.


A former colleague, Myron Rushetzky, confirmed the death, of pancreatic cancer, at Calvary Hospital.


The writers of newspaper headlines generally toil in anonymity, and over time a few others have been posited as the creator of this one. But among the salty, ink-stained, intemperate cadre of New York journalists who wistfully recall the days when men wore hats and newspapers were made only of paper, Mr. Musetto was widely credited as the creator of this headline, spread across The Post's front page on April 15, 1983.


The crime behind the headline was lurid even by tabloid standards. On April 13, 1983, Charles Dingle, drinking in a tavern in the Jamaica section of Queens, argued with the owner, Herbert Cummings, and shot him to death. He then took several women hostage, raping one and forcing another, in an apparent bid to confound the police, to cut off Mr. Cummings's head.


Apprehended the next day, Mr. Dingle was convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life. Denied parole several times, he died in the Wende Correctional Facility near Buffalo in 2012.


But what endured in public memory far longer than the crime was the headline, with its verbless audacity, arresting parallel adjectives and forceful trochaic slams. (The corresponding headline in The New York Times that day proclaimed, genteelly, "Owner of a Bar Shot to Death; Suspect Is Held." Headlessness was not mentioned until the third paragraph; toplessness not at all.)


Mr. Musetto's headline, exquisitely emblematic of The Post under Rupert Murdoch, quickly insinuated itself into popular culture. It appeared on T-shirts; as the title of a 1995 movie starring Raymond J. Barry and loosely based on the crime; and as the name of a 2007 book, "Headless Body in Topless Bar: The Best Headlines From America's Favorite Newspaper."


continues:http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/10/business/media/vincent-musetto-74-author-of-headless-headline-of-ageless-fame.html

Friday, June 19, 2015

If you haven't see this before...



THIS is truly funny, especially if you have kids...


Actual conversations with my 2 year old daughter, as re-enacted by me and another full-grown man - Episode 6


Thursday, June 11, 2015

When Christopher Lee Hunted Nazis

 

Beyond his acting prowess, it turns out Christopher Lee was a pretty amazing human, period. According to family lore , he was a descendent of Charlemagne on his father's side, and of the infamous Borgias on his mother's side. He sang on multiple heavy metal albums in his 80s and 90s. He served in the Special Operations Executive during World War II (also called Winston Churchill's "Secret Army").

Oh, and he also hunted Nazis.


Read more: 


Space Weird Thing

 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ygrdAvmr-MA&feature=youtu.be

Published on May 26, 2015

This is a sweded parody of "Space Oddity," the David Bowie song (and music video). 

The lyrics contain only the thousand most common words in English. 

It's a loving tribute to David Bowie and it's inspired by Flight of the Conchords, Michel Gondry, and especially the Up-Goer Five diagram by Randall Munroe.


Sweded:

The summarized recreation of popular pop-culture films using limited budgets and a camcorder. The process is called sweding. Upon completion the film has been Sweded..

.

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Death drives a Minivan


Wednesday, June 03, 2015

: How WWII Made America Literate

 

excerpt


Long before Pearl Harbor, American military leaders understood that maintaining the morale of their civilian troops was not a luxury but an iron necessity, and that by far the easiest way of doing so was to ensure that they had plenty of books and magazines to read in their off hours. In the words of Bill Mauldin, whose wartime cartoons so memorably portrayed the everyday life of the American G.I., "Soldiers at the front read K-ration labels when the contents are listed on the package, just to be reading something."


Because the Army Library Service had fallen into what Manning calls "a state of neglect" between the wars, it launched a national drive called the Victory Book Campaign, which by mid-1942 had collected 10 million donated books. But many of these unwanted books were of no more interest to servicemen than to their original owners, and it was increasingly evident that getting books into the hands of overseas troops would very soon become far more important—as well as logistically challenging, given the size and weight of hardbacks.


The solution was to distribute paperbacks, which had been introduced to the United States by Pocket Books in 1939. At a time when most hardbacks cost two dollars or more—$33 in today's dollars—Pocket Books printed 38 million 25-cent paperbacks in 1943 alone. Its success persuaded other publishers that it would make commercial sense to work with the military on a program to print books for soldiers, the assumption being that to do so would create a new market for inexpensive paperback reprints after the war. Thinking along closely similar lines, Time, the New Yorker, and other magazines created miniaturized "pony editions" for servicemen.


: How WWII Made America Literate

 

excerpt


Long before Pearl Harbor, American military leaders understood that maintaining the morale of their civilian troops was not a luxury but an iron necessity, and that by far the easiest way of doing so was to ensure that they had plenty of books and magazines to read in their off hours. In the words of Bill Mauldin, whose wartime cartoons so memorably portrayed the everyday life of the American G.I., "Soldiers at the front read K-ration labels when the contents are listed on the package, just to be reading something."


Because the Army Library Service had fallen into what Manning calls "a state of neglect" between the wars, it launched a national drive called the Victory Book Campaign, which by mid-1942 had collected 10 million donated books. But many of these unwanted books were of no more interest to servicemen than to their original owners, and it was increasingly evident that getting books into the hands of overseas troops would very soon become far more important—as well as logistically challenging, given the size and weight of hardbacks.


The solution was to distribute paperbacks, which had been introduced to the United States by Pocket Books in 1939. At a time when most hardbacks cost two dollars or more—$33 in today's dollars—Pocket Books printed 38 million 25-cent paperbacks in 1943 alone. Its success persuaded other publishers that it would make commercial sense to work with the military on a program to print books for soldiers, the assumption being that to do so would create a new market for inexpensive paperback reprints after the war. Thinking along closely similar lines, Time, the New Yorker, and other magazines created miniaturized "pony editions" for servicemen.


Monday, June 01, 2015

"Riddle me this, Batman!"

 

Friday, May 29, 2015

Sheldon has a point

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Simian Robot Climbs and Rolls to Prep for Challenge




http://news.discovery.com/tech/robotics/simian-robot-climbs-and-rolls-to-prep-for-challenge-150527.htm

 I love the line, "Discretion is advised for anyone with robot revolution paranoia issues."

.

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Mmmmmmmm. Maggots.



from Nature.com


"Eat insects for fun, not to help the environment"

http://www.nature.com/news/eat-insects-for-fun-not-to-help-the-environment-1.17630

=====

You keep using the word "Fun."
I do not think it means what you think it means.

.


LOL

 
 

Thought for Today... on Perfection


 
"More than 3 million parts, making up 700,000 components, were contained in a single Saturn V [rocket]."


So, if 99.99% of those parts worked perfectly ... there would still be 300 parts that could fail.

.


 
 

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Ride, Sally, Ride


McSweeney : Kafka’s Joke Book.



 
What's the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

Nothing after Albert's inexplicable transformation. Every breath was agony.

more at
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/kafkas-joke-book

Monday, May 18, 2015

: xkcd on the Placebo Effect



 
 

FW: Lab Safety